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World first for tuning fork level switch

05 February 2013

The latest addition to the VEGA portfolio of vibrating limit switches for liquids, VEGASWING 66, is believed to offer a world first.

The limit switch has been designed for reliable, self monitoring and fail safe switching in applications with process temperatures up to +450°C and process pressures up to 160 bar.

Traditionally, vibrating level switches have been limited to process conditions up to +280°C and 100 bar. By developing a new tuning fork drive, deployment of the instrument far beyond these limits has been made possible.

The resulting performance capability is for process temperatures from -196°C to +450°C and pressures from 0 to 160 bar.

Because the switch is largely unaffected by product properties, such as changing product density and electrical properties, the vibrating level switch is very versatile. It can be installed in any orientation and supplied in lengths up to 6m. Adjustment with product level is not required for setup and it is said to switch reliably and repeatably when a point level is reached.

Integrated monitoring capabilities allow accreditation to SIL2 and EN steam boiler regulations and a remote test is also available. VEGASWING 66 is the first level switch for high-pressure, high and low temperature applications; for example distillation columns in the oil and gas industry, steam boilers (for high and low water limits) and in cryogenic, liquid gas tank applications for LNG and nitrogen.


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