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Introduction of high throughput PXI frame grabber

28 June 2011

National Instruments has announced the introduction of the NI PXIe-1435 high-performance Camera Link frame grabber, which enables users to integrate high-speed and high-resolution imaging into PXI systems.

By combining high-throughput imaging with the benefits of off-the-shelf PXI measurement hardware, NI now believes that it offers a complete suite of software-defined solutions for demanding automated test applications in industries such as consumer electronics, automotive and semiconductor.

The NI PXIe-1435 is said to be the industry’s highest throughput PXI frame grabber and acquires from all Camera Link camera configurations, including 10-tap extended-full, with up to 850 MB/sec of throughput. Engineers can power cameras through Power over Camera Link (PoCL)-enabled cables, eliminating the need for additional wires in deployment environments. The frame grabber also offers 512 MB of DDR2 onboard acquisition memory for additional reliability when transferring large images. Onboard digital I/O includes four bidirectional transistor-transistor logic (TTL), two opto-isolated inputs and one quadrature encoder for triggering and communicating inspection results with automation devices.

The high throughput and low latency of the Camera Link standard are said to make the module ideal for line-scan image sensors, which engineers can use for surface inspection of large areas, including finding esthetic and functional defects in solar panels and dead pixels in flat panel displays. The NI PXIe-1435 frame grabber also works well in industrial applications such as fault analysis using a stop trigger to record images before and after an event on the factory floor, and medical device applications such as analysing intricacies in movement and recording stimulus response in objects from heart valves to eye corneas.


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