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Titan ultrasonic flowmeter

12 April 2010

Small bore ultrasonic flowmeter ‘breakthrough’. U.K. based Titan Enterprises says it has developed a new time-of-flight ultrasonic flowmeter capable of monitoring flow over a range of 200:1 with an accuracy better than +1.5%. The instrument includes a USB interface so engineers can monitor its performance directly from a laptop.

Titan's Atrato
Titan's Atrato

Titan’s (www.flowmeters.co.uk) founder, Trevor Forster (photo), believes the Atrato’s fully symmetrical, concentric signals coupled with the ability to achieve desired timing accuracies will get the attention of the market.

The instrument, which he has named “Atrato,” is largely immune to viscosity, handling flows from laminar to turbulent.

He says in the nearly 40 years of business he has sold well over 250,000 flowmeters to customers in over 40 countries.

The Atrato is aimed at a wide customer base including Industrial engineering, plant operators, medical equipment supply, drink dispensing, and laboratory technicians.

According to Mr. Forster, a big plus of the instrument is the computer interface.

“The USB connection permits the user to monitor the rate and total on their laptop in addition to operating parameters such as the pulse resolution units,” he said. “At a later date, data logging and operation statistics will also be possible.”

Mr. Forster thinks the future of flow measurement is going to be ultrasonic or Coriolis. “They’re the only two long-term viable technologies because they’re not intrusive.”

Cranfield University

Titan Enterprises began developing the Atrato in 2001 as part of a long term plan and was commissioned with Cranfield University. with one of the foremost fluid engineering establishments, Cranfield University.

Professor Mike Sanderson, Emeritus Professor of Fluid Instrumentation at Cranfield said: “The Atrato’s unique clean bore construction makes it ideal for hygienic applications.

“The use of low frequency ultrasound and advanced signal processing to interrogate the flow ensures that the flowmeter provides high accuracy over a wide turndown range. In addition the technology developed for the Atrato has the flexibility to provide the basis of a family of flowmeters suitable for an even wider range of flows and applications.”


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