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Experts Unite for Pumping Station Conference

27 March 2008

Experts from the water and waste industry will gather in Cranfield, UK, June 17 to 19, 2008, to discuss methods and approaches for pumping station design and maintenance. The Water and Wastewater Pumping Stations conference, the fourth for organiser BHR Group, aims to provide information about best practice, latest ideas, products and techniques.

Recent floods in the UK have highlighted the dependence on pumping station performance
Recent floods in the UK have highlighted the dependence on pumping station performance

Delegates are expected to come from all over the world for this international conference and BHR has considered the varying demands and issues affecting individual regions.

For example, the organisation claims that UK attention is focussed on the best compromise between the expectations of stakeholders, customers and government. Additional pressures come from the conflicting demands of energy conservation and climate change policies initiated in Europe. However, concerns from the Middle East will be driven by different demands, such as minimising H2S release or clearing vast quantities of sand entering the sump, which may require a different approach to familiar problems.

BHR says the conference is particularly timely this year because of increasing demands on designers, consultants, contractors and users of pumping stations, due, in part, to recent floods in the UK. Whilst safe and effective operation of pumping stations remains the primary requirement, calls for energy reduction are growing in importance. Designers face the challenge of delivering new stations with the specified performance but which minimise capital and operating costs. The need for refurbishment and continued improvement of existing facilities remains and demand for additional or more powerful pumping stations may increase, driven, according to the organisation, by climate change fears.

The event is designed for those involved with government agencies; water, power and process companies; consultants; contractors; plant suppliers; international development agencies and research and development agencies. It is also supported by the International Association for Hydraulic Engineering and Research (IAHR), The Pump Centre, British Water and the British Pump Manufacturers Association (BPMA).


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