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Wireless connectivity in the world's harshest environments

26 October 2015

Products from Digi International, a provider of mission-critical machine-to-machine (M2M) and IoT connectivity products and services, have been selected for implementation in some of the world's most extreme environments.

The company provides wireless M2M connectivity that delivers the performance needed to build and deploy critical infrastructures in challenging environments, allowing companies to deploy and manage mission-critical wireless communications that work in demanding conditions.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), for example, has worked with Digi as part of a program to determine potential applications of wireless technologies in space. Digi's XBee ZigBee products were used as part of a five-node network to monitor Exo-Brake performance - a specially-designed braking device that operates similar to a parachute at extremely high speeds and low air pressures. The flight plan called for a payload to be delivered by a suborbital rocket to roughly 250 miles above earth. The XBee modules were used to create the wireless sensor data network for the Exo-Brake, and transfer the data to a satellite uplink. Data captured included acceleration as well as temperature and air pressure.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is in the process of deploying Digi wireless routers as critical backup communications to more than 70 of its remote Doppler radars which are  used for hazardous weather observation and detection.


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